NWS: Possible tornado hits Miami County


Touchdown likely won’t be confirmed for a day

By Miami Valley Today staff



CBC in need of Type O Positive blood donors

DAYTON — Community Blood Center is in critical need of type O positive blood and is calling on donors for help. Emergency room usage at area hospitals was especially high during the Memorial Day weekend and the supply has been further challenged by the damaging tornadoes that struck the Miami Valley Monday night.

CBC is asking people who are type O to donate blood at the Dayton Community Blood Center, 349 S. Main St. Donors can visit www.DonorTime.com or call (800) 388-GIVE to schedule the best time to donate.

The Dayton CBC Donor Center is under a water boil advisory and is experiencing low water pressure but is operating at full capacity.

People in good health, age 17 and over (age 16 with signed parental consent) can give blood.

Type O positive is the most common blood type (37 percent of the population) and is therefore needed by many patients. Type O positive is the universal blood type for all positive RH factor (O, A, B, and AB positive) patients.

CBC has a limited number of community blood drives scheduled this week due to the holiday period.

CBC is asking donors to support a blood drive from 2-6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29 at the First Presbyterian Church, 20 S. Walnut St., Troy, and to keep appointments if possible to help replenish the blood supply:

MIAMI COUNTY — A tornado touchdown in Miami County from Monday night’s storms likely won’t be confirmed until Wednesday, according to the National Weather Service.

According to Myron Padgett, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Wilmington, there is a high probability that a tornado did touch down in the county, however, because there is widespread damage in the state, a survey team from the NWS likely will not make it to Miami County until Wednesday morning to confirm the tornado. In the meanwhile, Padgett said the Miami County Emergency Management Agency was assessing the damage on Tuesday and sharing their findings with the NWS.

“Most of the damage was probably from a tornado that touched down,” Padgett said. “It is highly likely that there was a tornado. The Ludlow Falls, Laura area was at the stronger end of it.”

Survey teams were headed to Mercer, Montgomery, Pickaway and Greene counties in Ohio on Tuesday, according to the NWS website.

Padgett said several simultaneous storms were in the area Monday night, spawning what is believed to be multiple tornadoes in the state.

According to Padgett, the storms hit between 10 p.m. and midnight and locally began in the southwestern part of Miami County between Troy and Tipp City and the tornadic activity likely touched down in the Laura and Ludlow Falls area based on damage reports.

“There are reports of houses damaged, trailers flipped over in the southwestern part of county, trees down and other minor damage,” Padgett said.

The National Weather Service on Monday evening reported cloud rotation and possible tornadoes in eastern Indiana and with those storms came reports of a possible tornado in the Ludlow Falls, Laura, and Potsdam area. The storm, reportedly moving northeast at 35 miles per hour, left a path of destruction throughout Union Township and portions of Monroe Township.

Even before the tornado sirens stopped, firefighters from West Milton, Ludlow Falls, Laura, and Pleasant Hill began the task of going door-to-door in the damage path, checking on residents, according to reports. A number of homes and house trailers in the area sustained damage or were destroyed by winds. Trees and power lines were ripped from the ground, knocking out power to many and blocking roadways, making welfare checks more difficult for first responders.

Flooding was reported across many roadways in the area of the storm. The Troy Fire Department responded to calls on I-75 after motorists reportedly hydroplaned off the highway and became stranded in high water.

Medic crews were kept busy as they moved from call to call. Several calls for medic service came in, including an evacuation of McKinley Commons Senior Apartments in West Milton where the loss of power put residents who were on oxygen in jeopardy.

Darkness, coupled with widespread loss of electric, hindered efforts to check on those who were in need of assistance.

A shelter was set up in West Milton to house those displaced by the storm. The American Red Cross is assisting those in need.

Touchdown likely won’t be confirmed for a day

By Miami Valley Today staff

CBC in need of Type O Positive blood donors

DAYTON — Community Blood Center is in critical need of type O positive blood and is calling on donors for help. Emergency room usage at area hospitals was especially high during the Memorial Day weekend and the supply has been further challenged by the damaging tornadoes that struck the Miami Valley Monday night.

CBC is asking people who are type O to donate blood at the Dayton Community Blood Center, 349 S. Main St. Donors can visit www.DonorTime.com or call (800) 388-GIVE to schedule the best time to donate.

The Dayton CBC Donor Center is under a water boil advisory and is experiencing low water pressure but is operating at full capacity.

People in good health, age 17 and over (age 16 with signed parental consent) can give blood.

Type O positive is the most common blood type (37 percent of the population) and is therefore needed by many patients. Type O positive is the universal blood type for all positive RH factor (O, A, B, and AB positive) patients.

CBC has a limited number of community blood drives scheduled this week due to the holiday period.

CBC is asking donors to support a blood drive from 2-6 p.m. Wednesday, May 29 at the First Presbyterian Church, 20 S. Walnut St., Troy, and to keep appointments if possible to help replenish the blood supply:

Mike Ullery, Melanie Yingst and Melody Vallieu contributed to this story.

Mike Ullery, Melanie Yingst and Melody Vallieu contributed to this story.