Marker re-installed at city’s first graveyard


Dan Walter, left, president of the Champaign County Historical Society, and Kerry Brugger, city Director of Administration, stand by the re-installed Ohio Historical Marker at Urbana’s first graveyard. In 2014 the historical society, the city and others dedicated the marker at the northeast corner of Kenton and Ward streets to commemorate the graveyard (1805-1855) and the War Council of 1812, which took place about 100 yards to the west. Last year the marker suffered significant damage and was returned to the manufacturer for repair. “We sincerely appreciate Director Brugger and the city of Urbana taking the initiative to repair and re-install this important marker,” said Walter. “People need to understand that considerable research and monies go into the creation of Ohio Historical Markers and that they need to be protected.”

Dan Walter, left, president of the Champaign County Historical Society, and Kerry Brugger, city Director of Administration, stand by the re-installed Ohio Historical Marker at Urbana’s first graveyard. In 2014 the historical society, the city and others dedicated the marker at the northeast corner of Kenton and Ward streets to commemorate the graveyard (1805-1855) and the War Council of 1812, which took place about 100 yards to the west. Last year the marker suffered significant damage and was returned to the manufacturer for repair. “We sincerely appreciate Director Brugger and the city of Urbana taking the initiative to repair and re-install this important marker,” said Walter. “People need to understand that considerable research and monies go into the creation of Ohio Historical Markers and that they need to be protected.”


Submitted photo

Dan Walter, left, president of the Champaign County Historical Society, and Kerry Brugger, city Director of Administration, stand by the re-installed Ohio Historical Marker at Urbana’s first graveyard. In 2014 the historical society, the city and others dedicated the marker at the northeast corner of Kenton and Ward streets to commemorate the graveyard (1805-1855) and the War Council of 1812, which took place about 100 yards to the west. Last year the marker suffered significant damage and was returned to the manufacturer for repair. “We sincerely appreciate Director Brugger and the city of Urbana taking the initiative to repair and re-install this important marker,” said Walter. “People need to understand that considerable research and monies go into the creation of Ohio Historical Markers and that they need to be protected.”

Dan Walter, left, president of the Champaign County Historical Society, and Kerry Brugger, city Director of Administration, stand by the re-installed Ohio Historical Marker at Urbana’s first graveyard. In 2014 the historical society, the city and others dedicated the marker at the northeast corner of Kenton and Ward streets to commemorate the graveyard (1805-1855) and the War Council of 1812, which took place about 100 yards to the west. Last year the marker suffered significant damage and was returned to the manufacturer for repair. “We sincerely appreciate Director Brugger and the city of Urbana taking the initiative to repair and re-install this important marker,” said Walter. “People need to understand that considerable research and monies go into the creation of Ohio Historical Markers and that they need to be protected.”
https://www.urbanacitizen.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2018/08/web1_Web-6.jpgDan Walter, left, president of the Champaign County Historical Society, and Kerry Brugger, city Director of Administration, stand by the re-installed Ohio Historical Marker at Urbana’s first graveyard. In 2014 the historical society, the city and others dedicated the marker at the northeast corner of Kenton and Ward streets to commemorate the graveyard (1805-1855) and the War Council of 1812, which took place about 100 yards to the west. Last year the marker suffered significant damage and was returned to the manufacturer for repair. “We sincerely appreciate Director Brugger and the city of Urbana taking the initiative to repair and re-install this important marker,” said Walter. “People need to understand that considerable research and monies go into the creation of Ohio Historical Markers and that they need to be protected.” Submitted photo