County Health District tracking septic systems


By Cindy Cozad



Since 2015 every homeowner with a septic system is required by the Ohio Department of Health to have an operation permit to operate their sewage treatment system. Champaign Health District did not require monitoring of systems as a condition of renewing a systems operation permit until 2015. We will be slowly adding each system in Champaign County as we inspect each property.

Currently a list is being complied whenever we go to your property, example: an outbuilding, addition added to the property, water sample, a report received that a system was pumped or alteration of your system is being inspected by us, etc. These new permits will be renewed every 10 years at which time a notice will be sent advising the homeowner of a fee that will be due and valid for the next 10 years. This will start in 2025.

If you have a “service contract” with a service provider registered in Champaign County and send in a copy of your agreement with them, along with their annual report, our fee will be waived. If you do not sign a service contract we will do the inspection and the homeowner will be advised of any maintenance or system failures that are to be corrected and a re-inspection done to ensure a properly working system.

Please note that failure to comply with the requested information and payment for this permit will result in requesting for a placement of a lien on real estate property in accordance with ORC 3709.091 with the County Auditor’s office.

As no system lasts forever you can extend the life of the system and avoid expensive replacement with regular maintenance, replacement of broken parts, having it pumped on a regular basis (3 to 5 years), and not flushing grease, disposable diapers, kitty litter, paper towels, sanitary napkins and hazardous chemicals, etc. Without proper maintenance and a good system design, your sewage could go into your neighbor’s yard as well as theirs coming into yours contaminating the ground water with disease-causing germs like E. coli, Salmonella, Shigella, polio and hepatitis. In addition to diseases, mosquitoes and flies that spread some illnesses can breed in areas where liquid waste reaches the surface.

We are hoping our community will embrace this change as a positive step to ensure all our health and well being.

By Cindy Cozad

Cindy Cozad is the Champaign Health District’s environmental secretary.

Cindy Cozad is the Champaign Health District’s environmental secretary.