It’s the weekend to ‘spring forward’


Check on those smoke alarms, too

AP wire and other reports



Outdoor enthusiasts will gain an extra hour of light at the end of Sunday. Time springs forward at 2 a.m. that day. A fisherman looks for a good spot in the middle of Kiser Lake this week. Temperatures are unseasonably warm for early March and predicted to stay that way until March 18. Normal daytime temperatures are in the mid-40s, but spring arrived early with daily conditions exceeding the middle to upper 60s.

Outdoor enthusiasts will gain an extra hour of light at the end of Sunday. Time springs forward at 2 a.m. that day. A fisherman looks for a good spot in the middle of Kiser Lake this week. Temperatures are unseasonably warm for early March and predicted to stay that way until March 18. Normal daytime temperatures are in the mid-40s, but spring arrived early with daily conditions exceeding the middle to upper 60s.


Brenda Burns|Urbana Daily Citizen

Lose an hour of sleep this weekend, gain an hour of evening light for months ahead: Daylight saving time is back.

Set those clocks 60 minutes ahead before you hit the hay Saturday night. The time change officially starts Sunday at 2 a.m. local time.

The time change is not observed in Hawaii, most of Arizona, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Marianas.

Don’t forget to change smoke alarm batteries

State Fire Marshal Larry L. Flowers is reminding Ohioans to make a potentially lifesaving change when they move their clocks forward one hour on Sunday, March 13: Change the batteries in your smoke alarms.

In conjunction with Ohio’s fire departments and the Safe & Sound campaign, the Division of State Fire Marshal encourages Ohioans to make a habit of changing the batteries in their smoke detectors at least twice a year – at the beginning and end of daylight saving time. Standard time returns Nov. 6.

The Safe & Sound campaign aims to reduce fire deaths in Ohio, and working smoke alarms play a major role in this initiative.

“Smoke alarms are the first warning sign of a fire. These devices give you potentially lifesaving seconds to escape,” Flowers said. “The alarms have to be working in order to warn you. That’s why testing them is an important first step in preparing for a fire.”

For the greatest protection, install a smoke detector on every level of your home and inside and outside of each sleeping area. In addition, Ohioans are encouraged to develop an escape plan with two ways out and make sure every family member knows what to do and where to meet outside if the fire alarm sounds. Take time to practice both a primary and secondary escape plan, so that if a real emergency occurred, you and your family know what to do.

Marshal Flowers offers these additional tips:

-Test smoke alarms at least once each month to ensure that they are working properly.

-Vacuum the dust from inside the detector at least once every year.

-Never “borrow” a smoke detector’s battery for another use.

-Change batteries twice a year or if a detector “chirps” to signal low battery power.

If you have a smoke alarm that was installed before March 13, 2006, replace the entire unit this weekend.

Outdoor enthusiasts will gain an extra hour of light at the end of Sunday. Time springs forward at 2 a.m. that day. A fisherman looks for a good spot in the middle of Kiser Lake this week. Temperatures are unseasonably warm for early March and predicted to stay that way until March 18. Normal daytime temperatures are in the mid-40s, but spring arrived early with daily conditions exceeding the middle to upper 60s.
https://www.urbanacitizen.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2016/03/web1_fisherman2.jpgOutdoor enthusiasts will gain an extra hour of light at the end of Sunday. Time springs forward at 2 a.m. that day. A fisherman looks for a good spot in the middle of Kiser Lake this week. Temperatures are unseasonably warm for early March and predicted to stay that way until March 18. Normal daytime temperatures are in the mid-40s, but spring arrived early with daily conditions exceeding the middle to upper 60s. Brenda Burns|Urbana Daily Citizen
Check on those smoke alarms, too

AP wire and other reports

Information from the Associated Press and the state fire marshal’s office.

Information from the Associated Press and the state fire marshal’s office.