Urbana Hospital earns Energy Star certification


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Jamie Houseman, president of Urbana Hospital, said the ENERGY STAR® certification indicates the hospital’s concern for the environment and public health.

Jamie Houseman, president of Urbana Hospital, said the ENERGY STAR® certification indicates the hospital’s concern for the environment and public health.


Submitted photo

Mercy Health-Urbana Hospital has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR® certification for superior energy performance.

“Improving the energy efficiency of our nation’s buildings is critical to protecting our environment,” said Jean Lupinacci, chief of the ENERGY STAR Commercial & Industrial Branch. “From the boiler room to the board room, organizations are leading the way by making their buildings more efficient and earning EPA’s ENERGY STAR certification.”

The EPA verifies that ENERGY STAR-certified buildings and plants perform in the top 25 percent of buildings nationwide, based on weather-normalized source energy use that considers occupancy, hours of operation, and other key metrics. ENERGY STAR is the only energy efficiency certification in the United States that is based on actual, verified energy performance.

“We’re honored to earn the ENERGY STAR for superior energy performance at Urbana Hospital and appreciate the efforts of everyone who is involved in its efficient operation,” said Mercy Health – Urbana Hospital President Jamie Houseman. “We believe in being good stewards of our resources. Saving energy is just one of the ways we show our community we care and are committed to doing our part to protect the environment and public health, both today and for future generations. We continue to look for opportunities to save energy and dollars in support of our mission.”

Houseman credits the hospital’s Plant Operations Director Bob Jenkins and his team for earning the ENERGY STAR certification. The achievement was based largely on the following efforts by the plant operations team:

-Installation of a switch allowing for variable steam pressure for sterilization, heating and hot water needs in the operating room that reduced energy needs by 50%

-Conversion of interior lighting circuitry and lighting with the help of available energy grants that greatly reduced energy consumption

-Conversion of the entire hospital campus’s exterior lighting to LED with the help of a third party and grant money which yielded huge savings on energy and energy costs while also making the grounds safer and more appealing

-Installation of variable speed drives on motors that resulted in reduced energy consumption in times of low demand, making the motors more efficient and reducing the energy needed for certain applications

On average, ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants use 35 percent less energy, cause 35 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions and are less expensive to operate than their peers—all without sacrifices in performance or comfort.

To date, tens of thousands of buildings and plants across all fifty states have earned the ENERGY STAR. For more information about ENERGY STAR for Buildings and Plants, visit www.energystar.gov/buildings

Jamie Houseman, president of Urbana Hospital, said the ENERGY STAR® certification indicates the hospital’s concern for the environment and public health.
https://www.urbanacitizen.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2021/01/web1_Jamie-Houseman.jpgJamie Houseman, president of Urbana Hospital, said the ENERGY STAR® certification indicates the hospital’s concern for the environment and public health. Submitted photo

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Submitted by Mercy Health.

Submitted by Mercy Health.