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By Amanda Douridas



Cover crops reduce soil erosion and nutrient loss while adding organic matter to crop fields.

Cover crops reduce soil erosion and nutrient loss while adding organic matter to crop fields.


Submitted photo

Interested in growing cover crops or trying different mixes? Join other farmers on March 14 for an informal visit to view what eight different mixes of cover crops did over the winter and how they look before planting. The cover crops were planted after a sweet corn crop late last summer and produced a lot of growth. Some were winter kill species while a few are still growing.

Cover crops provide the opportunity to reduce soil erosion and nutrient loss while adding organic matter to crop fields. Depending on the species, they can also be used to scavenge nitrogen from the soil and break up compacted areas through root growth.

Tom Smith will host the event on his farm in West Liberty, 2648 Mt. Tabor Road, from 2 to 4 p.m. on March 14. There is a barn beside the cover crops so the visit will proceed rain or shine. Along with growing cover crops, Smith practices continuous no-till.

The event is free to attend but please RSVP to Amanda at Douridas.9@osu.edu or 937-484-1526.

Cover crops reduce soil erosion and nutrient loss while adding organic matter to crop fields.
https://www.urbanacitizen.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2019/03/web1_Amanda.jpgCover crops reduce soil erosion and nutrient loss while adding organic matter to crop fields. Submitted photo

By Amanda Douridas

Amanda Douridas is the Champaign Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Educator for The Ohio State University Extension.

Amanda Douridas is the Champaign Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension Educator for The Ohio State University Extension.