AP News in Brief at 9:04 p.m. EST


Video shows Paris attackers committing earlier IS atrocities

PARIS (AP) — New video released by the Islamic State group on Sunday shows the extremists who carried out the Nov. 13 attacks in Paris committing atrocities in IS-controlled territory while plotting the slaughter in the French capital that left 130 people dead and hundreds injured. The group also threatened to attack Britain.

The 17-minute video shows the extent of the planning that went into the multiple attacks in Paris, which French authorities have said from the beginning was planned in Syria. The video was provided online by the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors jihadi websites.

All nine militants seen in the video died in the Paris attacks or their aftermath. Seven of the attackers — four from Belgium and three from France — spoke fluent French. The two others — identified by their noms de guerre as Iraqis — spoke in Arabic.

Seven of the militants, including a 20-year-old who was the youngest of the group, were filmed standing behind bound captives, described as “apostates,” who were either beheaded or shot.

“Soon on the Champs-Elysées,” says Samy Amimour, who was raised in a Paris suburb near the French national stadium, as he holds a captive’s head aloft.

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After a wild winter weekend, a difficult commute awaits

NEW YORK (AP) — After a weekend of sledding, snowboarding and staying put, the blizzard-blanketed Eastern U.S. will confront a Monday commute slowed by slick roads, damaged transit lines and endless mounds of snow.

Authorities cautioned against unnecessary driving, airline schedules were in disarray and commuter trains will be delayed or cancelled for many as the work week begins after a storm that dumped near record snows on the densely populated Washington, D.C. to New York City corridor.

The last flakes fell just before midnight Saturday, but crews raced the clock all day Sunday to clear streets and sidewalks devoid of their usual bustle.

Ice chunks plunging from the roofs of tall buildings menaced people who ventured out in Philadelphia and New York. High winds on Manhattan’s Upper West Side kept the snow from entirely swallowing the tiny Mini Cooper of Daniel Bardman, who nervously watched for falling icicles as he dug out.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio encouraged people to leave their plowed-in cars covered with snow all week after a 1-day record of 26.6 inches fell in Central Park.

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At least 29 killed in snowstorm-related deaths

At least 29 people have died as a result of the mammoth snowstorm that pounded the eastern U.S. The deaths occurred in car accidents, from carbon monoxide poisoning, and from heart attacks while shoveling snow:

WASHINGTON

—An 82-year-old man who died after going into cardiac arrest while shoveling snow in front of his home in Washington is the first person whose death is related to the snowstorm in the city.

The District of Columbia’s Chief Medical Examiner, Roger A. Mitchell Jr., announced the man’s death during a news conference Sunday evening.

Mitchell did not release the man’s name or say when he died or where in the city he lived. He encouraged people shoveling to take breaks and make sure that they keep hydrated.

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AP PHOTOS: Cleanup begins after huge East Coast snowstorm

From West Virginia to southern Maine, millions of people are digging out following a massive storm that dumped up to 3 feet of snow in the Washington D.C. region, halted most travel in New York City and flooded some coastal areas in New Jersey.

New York and Baltimore began lifting travel restrictions and hearty souls ventured out on snow-choked streets Sunday, while mass transit systems up and down the coast gradually restored service.

The storm dropped snow from the Gulf Coast to New England, with areas of Washington surpassing 30 inches. The heaviest official report was 42 inches, in Glengary, West Virginia.

Here is a selection of Associated Press images of the aftermath of storm:

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Trump visits Iowa church: gets a lesson in humility

MUSCATINE, Iowa (AP) — On the second-to-last Sunday before the Iowa caucuses, Donald Trump settled into a fifth row pew of an Iowa church for a lesson in humility.

“I don’t know if that was aimed at me … perhaps,” Trump said after the hourlong service at the First Presbyterian Church.

Religious voters are a major factor in the opening contest on the presidential nominating calendar, and Trump has been working hard to build his appeal among them. His chief challenger in the Republican race is Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, a conservative preacher’s son who’s made deep inroads with evangelicals.

The service, which Trump’s campaign invited several reporters to observe, included hymns, readings and a performance by the children’s choir. Cream-colored stained glass in the window cast a golden glow.

At one point, Trump shared a prayer book with Debra Whitaker, an Iowa supporter seated to his right. She put her hand gently around Trump’s waist as the congregation sang Hymn 409, “God is Here!” Trump could be seen by some mouthing the words of the hymn.

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Clinton, Sanders take different lessons from Obama’s ’08 win

MARION, Iowa (AP) — To Bernie Sanders, President Barack Obama’s improbable victory in the 2008 Iowa caucuses was a testament to the power of an inspirational underdog. To Hillary Clinton, Obama’s win over her eight years ago proved the importance of a robust and refined political apparatus.

The Democratic presidential candidates’ theories are driven in part by necessity — Sanders’ has undeniable energy heading into the final week of campaigning in Iowa, while Clinton has a massive field operation that’s been on the ground for nearly a year. But they also reflect their competing visions of what Democratic voters are seeking in the 2016 election.

Sanders is running on a pledge of political revolution, one that builds on what he sees as the country’s great moments of change: the rise of trade unions, the legalization of gay marriage, and yes, Obama’s unexpected victory in the 2008 Iowa caucuses.

“Eight years ago, all over this country people said an African-American becoming president of the United States, you’re nuts, that can’t happen, too much racism in America,” Sanders said during a campaign stop Saturday. “And you think he’s going to win in a very white state? Ain’t going to happen. You made it happen. You made history.”

Clinton believes Democrats are looking less for another big moment of change and more for a steady hand who can build on Obama’s progress, but perhaps be more adept at managing Washington’s grinding gridlock.

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Despite patrols, sealing Greek sea border is near impossible

CHIOS, Greece (AP) — In the inky nighttime blackness, a small red dot appears on the radar screen, moving fast.

“That’s a smuggler,” the captain of the coast guard’s lifeboat says, swinging the vessel around and opening up the throttle, the boat cutting through the water on a frigid January night.

But the lifeboat, designed for search-and-rescue operations rather than high-speed chases, is no match for the smuggler’s speedboat. The smuggler ignores the searchlight, the shouts and the warning shots fired by the Greek coast guard, deftly navigating his small white vessel onto a tiny patch of beach among rocks.

There he disgorges his human cargo — men, women and children risking their lives in a quest for safety and a better future in Europe. They use ropes to scramble up a cliff, heading toward a lighthouse on an island they are soon to discover is deserted save for an army outpost. They will spend a cold, wet, uncomfortable night there until the coast guard can send boats in the morning.

Hour after hour, by night and by day, Greek coast guard patrols and lifeboats, reinforced by vessels from the European Union’s border agency Frontex, ply the waters of the eastern Aegean Sea along the frontier with Turkey. They are on the lookout for people being smuggled onto the shores of Greek islands — the front line of Europe’s massive refugee crisis.

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Magnitude-7.1 quake jolts Alaska; 4 homes lost

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A magnitude-7.1 quake knocked items off shelves and walls in Alaska early Sunday morning, jolting the nerves of residents in this earthquake-prone region. There were no reports of injuries, but four homes were lost to explosions or fire following the quake.

Alaska’s state seismologist, Michael West, called it the strongest earthquake in the state’s south-central region in decades. Alaska often has larger or more powerful earthquakes, such as a 7.9 last year in the remote Aleutian Islands.

“However, last night’s earthquake is significant because it was close enough to Alaska’s population centers,” West said, adding that aftershocks could continue for weeks.

The earthquake was widely felt by Anchorage residents. But the Anchorage and Valdez police departments said they hadn’t received any reports of injury or significant damage.

The earthquake struck at about 1:30 a.m. Alaska time and was centered 53 miles west of Anchor Point in the Kenai Peninsula, which is about 160 miles southwest of Anchorage, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Longtime rivals: A look at complex Vietnam-China ties

BEIJING (AP) — Divided opinions within Vietnam’s Communist Party on how to relate to giant neighbor and one-time ally China are among key factors in play at an eight-day congress to choose new leadership. A look at the countries’ shared history and some of the most recent ups and downs in relations.

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LONGTIME RIVALS

Vietnam and China have a complex relationship going back more than 2,000 years, including several periods of Chinese imperial occupation that were ended by Vietnamese uprisings. Despite its early support for the Vietnamese Communist Party, China invaded in 1979 in retaliation for Hanoi’s overthrow of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. Diplomatic ties were restored in 1991, but tensions have risen in recent years due to competing claims to islands and reefs in the South China Sea.

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Manning, Broncos scramble to Super Bowl in 20-18 win over NE

DENVER (AP) — When Peyton Manning was watching games from the locker room a few months ago, none of this seemed possible.

Manning back on the field, playing the role of the most decorated game manager in history.

Manning churning his 39-year-old legs around right end for a 12-yard gain and a first down.

Manning back in the Super Bowl.

The strangest season of No. 18’s Hall of Fame-ready career will play itself out all the way to the last game. Manning and the Denver Broncos are heading to the Super Bowl, thanks to his efficient offense and a big-play defense that saved a 20-18 victory over Tom Brady and the New England Patriots on Sunday.

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