The Latest: Sachs: Corporate corruption hurting the economy


WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ trip to Rome to speak the Vatican conference on social and economic justice (all times Eastern Daylight Time):

10:05 a.m.

One of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders’ foreign policy advisers is telling a Vatican conference that U.S. corporate greed and corruption have contributed to repeated financial, social and environmental crises.

Jeffrey Sachs, economist and head of the U.N.’s sustainable development network, told the Vatican conference that it’s time to “end the impunity of the rich and powerful.”

Sanders is expected to address the conference later Friday.

The conference is commemorating the 25th anniversary of St. John Paul II’s 1991 encyclical “Centesimus Annus” on the economy and social justice at the end of the Cold War.

Sachs, who was Poland’s lead economic adviser at the time and worked on the document, said it had aimed to support the market economic system being in adopted in Eastern Europe but “with the clear admonition to embed the market system in a moral system based on the universal destination of goods.”

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9:05 a.m.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has landed in Rome to attend a Vatican conference steeped in his lifelong passions of economic and social justice.

The Vermont senator is making the trip even while he faces a crucial New York primary against rival Hillary Clinton next week.

The self-described democratic socialist is an admirer of Pope Francis and will join several speakers commemorating the 25th anniversary of “Centesimus Annus,” a high-level teaching document by Pope John Paul II on the economy and social justice at the end of the Cold War.

The roughly 24-hour break from the campaign comes just five days before the New York primary.

Sanders is joined by his wife, Jane Sanders, and 10 family members, including four grandchildren.

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8:50 a.m.

Pope Francis has met with at least one participant of the Vatican conference on social and economic justice that Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is attending: Bolivian President Evo Morales.

Morales met for about a half-hour Friday morning with Francis before heading into the conference. Morales once again raised eyebrows with an unusual gift for the pontiff: three books about the health benefits of the coca leaf, the raw ingredient for cocaine.

The Vatican has said Francis has no plans to meet with conference participants or with Sanders.

He has a longstanding friendship with Morales, however, and visited him in Bolivia last summer. Morales sparked a minor diplomatic incident during the visit when he gave the pope a crucifix fashioned as a communist-style hammer and sickle. Francis said he wasn’t offended.

Coca leaf is widely chewed in the Andes to fight against altitude sickness and as a mild stimulant.

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3:00 a.m.

The Vatican conference drawing Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders away from the campaign for New York delegates is steeped in his lifelong passions of economic and social justice and reflects his admiration for Pope Francis.

Sanders departed New York for Rome after Thursday night’s debate with front-running rival Hillary Clinton. The self-described democratic socialist will join several speakers commemorating a high-level teaching document by Pope John Paul II on the economy and social justice at the end of the Cold War.

The Vermont senator is joined by his wife, Jane, and 10 family members, including four grandchildren. His spokesman said Sanders was still working on a draft of his speech on the plane.

The roughly 24-hour break from the campaign comes just five days before the New York primary.