Then and Now: The Curry School — Corrected


This “Then” photo of The Curry School was taken on the occasion (Sept. 20, 1913) of the reunion of black Civil War veterans and widows, sons and daughters from all parts of Ohio (Urbana Daily Citizen). Professor Elmer Curry is on the grass at the extreme left. This building at 325 E. Water St. was originally a residence owned by Philander B. Ross. It was purchased by the Urbana City Board of Education, which used it until 1898. Then Professor Curry acquired the property and moved the Curry Normal and Industrial Institute into the building. Over 2,000 mostly African-American students, youth and adults, were instructed in industrial skills, higher academics, and morality at the Institute. (Source: Sherry Virts, Champaign County Preservation Alliance)


Photos courtesy of the Champaign County Historical Society

Editor’s note: The Champaign County Historical Society regrets that the “Now” photo in the “Then and Now” submission printed Jan. 15, 2018, was not the Curry School. CCHS apologizes to the Urbana Daily Citizen and its readers for the error and has resubmitted a corrected photo (shown with this article). The Champaign County Historical Society, which provided these photos, is an all-volunteer, not-for-profit organization that preserves, protects and displays artifacts that tell Champaign County’s history. The society is funded by dues and donations and maintains a free public museum of history at 809 East Lawn Ave., Urbana.


Photos courtesy of the Champaign County Historical Society

This “Then” photo of The Curry School was taken on the occasion (Sept. 20, 1913) of the reunion of black Civil War veterans and widows, sons and daughters from all parts of Ohio (Urbana Daily Citizen). Professor Elmer Curry is on the grass at the extreme left. This building at 325 E. Water St. was originally a residence owned by Philander B. Ross. It was purchased by the Urbana City Board of Education, which used it until 1898. Then Professor Curry acquired the property and moved the Curry Normal and Industrial Institute into the building. Over 2,000 mostly African-American students, youth and adults, were instructed in industrial skills, higher academics, and morality at the Institute. (Source: Sherry Virts, Champaign County Preservation Alliance)

Editor’s note: The Champaign County Historical Society regrets that the “Now” photo in the “Then and Now” submission printed Jan. 15, 2018, was not the Curry School. CCHS apologizes to the Urbana Daily Citizen and its readers for the error and has resubmitted a corrected photo (shown with this article). The Champaign County Historical Society, which provided these photos, is an all-volunteer, not-for-profit organization that preserves, protects and displays artifacts that tell Champaign County’s history. The society is funded by dues and donations and maintains a free public museum of history at 809 East Lawn Ave., Urbana.

This “Then” photo of The Curry School was taken on the occasion (Sept. 20, 1913) of the reunion of black Civil War veterans and widows, sons and daughters from all parts of Ohio (Urbana Daily Citizen). Professor Elmer Curry is on the grass at the extreme left. This building at 325 E. Water St. was originally a residence owned by Philander B. Ross. It was purchased by the Urbana City Board of Education, which used it until 1898. Then Professor Curry acquired the property and moved the Curry Normal and Industrial Institute into the building. Over 2,000 mostly African-American students, youth and adults, were instructed in industrial skills, higher academics, and morality at the Institute. (Source: Sherry Virts, Champaign County Preservation Alliance)
http://www.urbanacitizen.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2018/01/web1_ThenWeb-4.jpgThis “Then” photo of The Curry School was taken on the occasion (Sept. 20, 1913) of the reunion of black Civil War veterans and widows, sons and daughters from all parts of Ohio (Urbana Daily Citizen). Professor Elmer Curry is on the grass at the extreme left. This building at 325 E. Water St. was originally a residence owned by Philander B. Ross. It was purchased by the Urbana City Board of Education, which used it until 1898. Then Professor Curry acquired the property and moved the Curry Normal and Industrial Institute into the building. Over 2,000 mostly African-American students, youth and adults, were instructed in industrial skills, higher academics, and morality at the Institute. (Source: Sherry Virts, Champaign County Preservation Alliance) Photos courtesy of the Champaign County Historical Society

Editor’s note: The Champaign County Historical Society regrets that the “Now” photo in the “Then and Now” submission printed Jan. 15, 2018, was not the Curry School. CCHS apologizes to the Urbana Daily Citizen and its readers for the error and has resubmitted a corrected photo (shown with this article). The Champaign County Historical Society, which provided these photos, is an all-volunteer, not-for-profit organization that preserves, protects and displays artifacts that tell Champaign County’s history. The society is funded by dues and donations and maintains a free public museum of history at 809 East Lawn Ave., Urbana.
http://www.urbanacitizen.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2018/01/web1_currynowEB.jpegEditor’s note: The Champaign County Historical Society regrets that the “Now” photo in the “Then and Now” submission printed Jan. 15, 2018, was not the Curry School. CCHS apologizes to the Urbana Daily Citizen and its readers for the error and has resubmitted a corrected photo (shown with this article). The Champaign County Historical Society, which provided these photos, is an all-volunteer, not-for-profit organization that preserves, protects and displays artifacts that tell Champaign County’s history. The society is funded by dues and donations and maintains a free public museum of history at 809 East Lawn Ave., Urbana. Photos courtesy of the Champaign County Historical Society

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU